Treatment Options

For a comprehensive list of issues, problems, and surgeries performed by Dr. Samudrala, click here.

 

Cervical Spine

Artificial Disk Replacement

is used to treat degenerative disk disease in the cervical and lumbar area. It is performed to alleviate pain and maintain motion in the spine. During the procedure the doctor will remove the disc and restore the disc height by inserting an implant in the disc space that allows the potential for motion. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form with information about cervical artificial disc replacement.

 

Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF)

is a surgical procedure used to treat neck problems such as cervical radiculopathy, disc herniations, fractures, and spinal instability. In this procedure, the surgeon enters the neck from the front (the anterior region) and removes a spinal disc (discectomy). The vertebrae above and below the disc are then held in place with bone graft and sometimes metal hardware. The goal is to help the bones to grow together into one solid bone. This is known as fusion. The medical term for fusion is arthrodesis. Operating on the back of the neck is more commonly used for neck fractures. That procedure is called posterior cervical fusion. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or here to view more webpages.

Posterior Cervical Fusion

is done through the back (posterior) of the neck. The surgery joins two or more neck vertebrae into one solid section of bone. The medical term for fusion is arthrodesis. Posterior cervical fusion is most commonly used to treat neck fractures and dislocations and to fix deformities in the curve of the neck. Surgeons sometimes attach metal hardware to the neck bones during posterior fusion surgery. This hardware is called instrumentation. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or here to view more webpages.

Cervical Discectomy

An anterior cervical discectomy is the most common surgical procedure to treat damaged cervical discs. Its goal is to relieve pressure on the nerve roots or on the spinal cord by removing the ruptured disc. During the surgery, the soft tissues of the neck are separated and the disc is removed. Sometimes the space between the vertebrae are left open. However, in order to maintain the normal height of the disc space, the surgeon may choose to fill the space with a bone graft. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or here to view more webpages.

Cervical Posterior Foraminotomy

Foraminotomy alleviates the symptoms of foraminal stenosis. In foraminal stenosis, a nerve root is compressed inside the neural foramen. This compression is usually the result of degenerative (or wear and tear) changes in the spine. Wear and tear from repeated stresses and strains on the neck can cause a spinal disc to begin to collapse. As the space between the vertebral bodies shrinks, the opening around the nerve root narrows. This squeezes the nerve. The nerve root is further squeezed in the foramen when the facet joint lining the outer edge of the foramen becomes inflamed and enlarged as a result of the same degenerative changes. The degenerative process can also cause bone spurs to develop and point into the foramen, causing further irritation. In a foraminotomy, the surgeon removes the tissues around the edges of the foramen, essentially widening the opening in order to take pressure off the nerve root. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form here to view more webpages about Cervical Posterior Foraminotomy.

Cervical Corpectomy

This is the removal of the vertebral body as well as the disc spaces at either end, to completely decompress the cervical canal thus relieving the pressre on the nerve roots or the spinal cord. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or here to learn more about Cervical Corpectomy

Cervical Laminectomy

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to relieve pressure on the spinal cord due to spinal stenosis. In spinal stenosis, bone spurs press against the spinal cord, leading to a condition called myelopathy. Myelopathy can produce problems with the bowels and bladder, disruptions in the way you walk, and impairments with fine motor skills in the hands. In a laminectomy, a small section of bone covering the back of the spinal cord is removed. Lamina refers to the roof of bone over the back of the spinal cord, and ectomy means the medical procedure for removing a section of the bony roof to take pressure off the spinal cord. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or click here for more information.

Thoracic Spine

Kyphoplasty

Is a procedure used to treat spinal fractures caused by osteoporosis, cancer or benign tumors. Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that can significantly reduce back pain and repair the broken bone of a spinal fracture. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or click here to learn more about Kyphoplasty.

Thoracic Posterior Fusion

A fusion is a surgical procedure that joins two or more bones (in this case vertebrae) together into one solid bone. The procedure is called a posterior fusion because the surgeon works on the back, or posterior, of the spine. Posterior fusion procedures in the thoracic spine are used to treat spine instability, severe degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, and fractures in the thoracic spine. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form with information about this thoracic procedure.

Lumbar Spine

Lumbar Laminectomy

is a spine surgery that involves removing bone to relieve excess pressure on the spinal nerve(s) in the lumbar spine, or lower back. The term laminectomy is derived from the Latin words lamina (thin plate, sheet or layer), and -ectomy (removal). A laminectomy removes or trims the lamina (roof) of the vertebrae to create space for the nerves leaving the spine. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form about Lumbar Laminectomy or here for more web pages about this procedure.

 

Lumbar Microdiscectomy

is an operation that involves using a surgical microscope and microsurgical techniques to access and treat the lumbar spine. By providing magnification and illumination, the microscope allows for a limited dissection. Only that portion of the herniated disc, which is pinching one or more nerve roots, is removed. The term discectomy is derived from the Latin words discus (flat, circular object or plate) and -ectomy (removal). Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form about Lumbar Microdiscectomy or here for more web pages about this procedure.

 

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF)

is a type of spine surgery that involves approaching the spine from the back (posterior) of the body to place bone graft material between two adjacent vertebrae (interbody) to promote bone growth that joins together, or fuses, the two structures (fusion). The bone graft material acts as a bridge, or scaffold, on which new bone can grow. The ultimate goal of the procedure is to restore spinal stability. Today, a PLIF may be performed using minimally invasive spine surgery, which allows the surgeon to use small incisions and gently separate the muscles surrounding the spine rather than cutting them. Traditional, open spine surgery involves cutting or stripping the muscles from the spine. A minimally invasive approach preserves the surrounding muscular and vascular function and minimizes scarring. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form with information or click on this link Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

 

Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

is a form of spine surgery in which the lumbar spine is approached through an incision in the back. The name of the procedure is derived from: transforaminal (through the foramen), lumbar (lower back), interbody (implants or bone graft placed between two vertebral bodies) and fusion (spinal stabilization). The TLIF is a variation of the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), in that it provides 360-degree fusion, avoids anterior access and associated complications, decreases manipulation of neural structures, reduces damage to ligamentous elements, minimizes excessive bone removal, enhances biomechanical stability, and provides early mobilization. Traditional, open spine surgery involves cutting or stripping the muscles from the spine. But today, a TLIF may be performed using minimally invasive spine surgery, a treatment that involves small incisions and muscle dilation, allowing the surgeon to gently separate the muscles surrounding the spine rather than cutting them. A minimally invasive approach preserves the surrounding muscular and vascular function and minimizes scarring. Learn more about Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion by clicking here.

 

Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion (AxiaLIF®)

The AxiaLIF® system includes surgical instruments for creating a safe and reproducible pre-sacral access route to the L5 - S1 vertebral bodies. The AxiaLIF® technique features novel instrumentation to enable standard of care fusion principles, distraction and stabilization of the anterior lumbar column while mitigating the soft tissue trauma associated with traditional lumbar fusion through open surgical incisions. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or click here to learn more about Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion®

eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF®)

The XLIF¨ approach is a minimally invasive procedure that allows the spine surgeon to have direct access to the intervertebral disc space and fuse the lumbar (low back) spine from the side of the body (lateral) as opposed to the front (anterior) or back (posterior). Like all minimally invasive spine surgery techniques, the XLIF procedure was developed from the need to treat disorders of the spine with the least amount of tissue (muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and abdominal organs) disruption possible, so that there is minimal tissue-related damage from the surgery, and the recovery time is therefore reduced. Learn more about eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion.

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF)

is a spine surgery that involves approaching the spine from the front of the body to remove disc or bone material from in between two adjacent lumbar vertebrae. The procedure may be performed either as an open surgery or using minimally invasive techniques. Click here to download an Adobe Acrobat form or click here for in-depth information about ALIF.

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